Bike Gear Charts - Everything About The Fancy Bikes And Gear Performance - lovemybike.net Bike Gear Charts - Everything About The Fancy Bikes And Gear Performance - lovemybike.net

Bike Gear Charts – Everything About The Fancy Bikes And Gear Performance


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In the modern world, more and more people are using cars. They easily commute from one place to another. There are still some people who love to commute on their bikes or bicycle as it is a healthy approach. This can ensure daily exercise. Most people also attach gears to their bike or bicycle to ensure smooth and speedy movement from one place to another. There are different types of gears that people can attach to their bike depending on the type of road or way they have to go on. Bike Gear Charts can help you if you are new and don’t know much about the usage of the gears in the bike. Let us get to know everything about it.

Basics

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Most people end up using the gears already present in their bikes but it must be avoided and they must swap the gears according to their needs. Bike Gear Charts can help you with the ratios required in different areas. For hilly areas cycling, the gear ratios would be different in comparison to the gear ratios you will be using for the trial, city riding, or club riding.

Teeth And Bike Gear Ratio

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Bike Gear Charts provides you with twenty-two options if there are two cogs in the front chainring and eleven cogs on the rear cassette. The level of hard work will depend on the selected rear cog and the number of teeth between the front chainring. If the chainring of the bike is 50/34T then it would mean that the bike has 50 inner rings and 34 outer rings. If the rear cassette is 11 with the speed of 11/32 then it would mean that there are 32 teeth and 11 cogs.

The Hardest And Easiest Gear

According to Bike Gear Chart, the hardest gear would be the one if you ride on a bike that has 50 tooth ring in the front and 11 tooth rings on the back. Then by dividing the two numbers you will get 4.55 which means that for every turn you have to turn the back wheel 4.55 times. This is suitable for riding on flat surfaces. For the easiest gear, your bike’s front side should have 34 teeth and the backside should have 32 teeth. By diving the two numbers you will get 1.06. This is suitable for riding in the mountains.

Effect Of Ratios Depending On Chainring

Compact chainrings are suitable for one who can maintain high cadence for a longer period. Whereas bigger chainrings are suitable for the people who can drag bigger gears at the meager cadence. The chainring also has an impact on the size of the step between each gear ratio.

Conclusion

Thus, Bike Gear Charts turn out to be useful if you don’t have much knowledge about the type of gears to be used for different pathways. Bike Gear Charts are helpful for you to know the ratios, to easily choose the gear, and to ensure a speedy and efficient ride.

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